Lamborghini Diablo, The Italian Four Wheels Devil

The Diablo was produced between 1990 and 2001. During this period, Lamborghini introduced several variations of the Diablo concept, which contributed to building Lamborghini’s legend and were extremely successful in terms of sales: almost 3,000 units were sold across the world.
The bosses at Lamborghini had wished for a maximum speed of at least 320 km/h, and the engineers made this wish come true. With a top speed of 325 km/h and acceleration of 0 to 100 km/h in 4.5 seconds, the Diablo claimed the pole position in the super sports cars segement.

Diablo SE30

The Diablo was presented to the public for sale on January 21, 1990. Its power came from a 5.7 L (348 cu in), 48-valve version of the existing Lamborghini V12 featuring dual overhead cams and computer-controlled multi-point fuel injection, producing a maximum output of 492 PS (362 kW; 485 hp) and 580 N·m (428 lb·ft) of torque. The vehicle could reach 100 km/h (62 mph) in about 4.5 seconds, with a top speed of 202 mph (325 km/h). The Diablo was rear-wheel drive and the engine was mid-mounted to aid its weight balance.

The Diablo came better equipped than the Countach; standard features included fully adjustable seats and steering wheel, electric windows, an Alpine stereo system, and power steering from 1993 onwards. Anti-lock brakes were not initially available, although they would eventually be used. A few options were available, including a custom-molded driver’s seat, remote CD changer and subwoofer, rear spoiler, factory fitted luggage set (priced at $2,600) and an exclusive Breguet clock for the dash (priced at $10,500).[4]

In 1995, this Lamborghini had a Safety Car role in Formula One, most notably at the Canadian Grand Prix where, however, it did not need to be officially deployed.
The Diablo VT was introduced in 1993.This provided the new nomenclature for the car (VT stands for viscous traction)
The Diablo Se30 was introduced in 1994 as a limited-production special model to commemorate the company’s 30th anniversary. The car was designed largely as a street-legal race vehicle that was lighter and more powerful than the standard Diablo. The engine received a healthy boost to 530 PS (390 kW; 523 hp) by means of a tuned fuel system, freer-flowing exhaust, and magnesium intake manifolds. The car remained rear-wheel drive to save weight, and omitted the electrically adjustable shock absorbers of the VT model, but it was equipped with adjustable-stiffness anti-roll bars which could be controlled from the interior, on the fly.
The Diablo SV was introduced in 1995 at the Geneva Auto Show, reviving the super veloce title.
A notable feature of the SV was an increase in horsepower to 517 PS (380 kW; 510 hp), which, paired with the two-wheel drive layout, could increase the likelihood of loss of traction during hard driving. Interestingly, despite its higher power output, the SV was priced as the entry-level model in the Diablo range, falling below the standard Diablo by a small margin. An adjustable rear spoiler was installed as standard equipment and could be color-matched to the car body or formed from carbon fiber. Other exterior changes included black tail lamp surrounds, repositioned rear fog and reverse lamps as on the Se30, dual front foglamps (rather than the quad style found on all previous models), an extra set of front brake cooling ducts, a ducted engine lid similar to that installed on the Diablo Se30 Jota, and optional “SV” decals for the sides of the car. The SV also featured larger diameter front brakes (340 mm (13.4 in)) and a corresponding increase in front wheel size to 18 inches,
though because this is the facelifted Diablo, gone are the classic pop-up lights, replaced by fixed clear lenses.

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